2010/2011 IMPACT STUDY

Check Your Mailboxes – the 2010/2011 Economic Impact Study is in the Mail!

By Gail Hanson – NHSA Executive Director

 

The NHSA has contracted with the Institute for New Hampshire Studies, Plymouth State University to conduct research about the economic impact of snowmobiling in New Hampshire during the 2010/2011 season. Your participation will be very important, as it will aid the New Hampshire Snowmobile Association’s efforts to support this outstanding sport and have a possible impact on legislative funding for the sport. The impact study is being mailed to a select group of names selected by a computer process. The survey will have approximately 10 questions, so please take your time and answer these questions as thoroughly and accurately as possible.

 

Thank you in advance for your cooperation and interest in supporting snowmobiling in New Hampshire.

 

Why should the Association do an Impact Study?

The impact study of 2002/2003 has given the association a new image. We are no longer looked at as just a group of snowmobilers. We are now thought of as a group that has power, clout, and the ability to make a sufficient difference when it comes to passing or not passing legislation. Over the years, snowmobiler’s needs and interests have become more complex. This means that we need statistics to help people understand what is happening and have a basis for planning the future of our sport. This impact study will illustrate the huge influence that snowmobiling has on the New Hampshire economy. The study will also show that all areas of the state benefit from snowmobiling activities, and that snowmobiling is one of the most important recreational activities in the State during the winter season.

 

The last impact study was done in 2002/2003. The results from this study showed:

  • Total impact on the state’s economy by snowmobilers was nearly $1.2 billion.
  • Spending by snowmobilers was 1% of the gross state product and more than 10% of all travelers spending in the state.
  • Average spending per visitor per day in New Hampshire was $67.07 per resident and $88.30 from non-residents.
  • In addition to spending on their trips, each snowmobiler spends $1,830.00 annually on equipment, clothing, club membership, insurance and state license fees.
  • Snowmobilers spend money on accommodations, for ground transportation, eating at restaurants, retail shopping, and other activities. All sectors of the economy benefit from snowmobiling activity. 8,099 New Hampshire jobs exist because of snowmobiling. The vast majority of those jobs (79%) are in the hospitality and leisure sector.
  • Substantial segment of snowmobile spending ends up being collected by the state in the form of state tax. 8.6 cents of every dollar spent in New Hampshire, by a snowmobiler, ends up being directly collected by the state. The state of course collects money in taxes on lodging, restaurants, foods, gasoline, business profits, registrations and fees paid to the State Parks Fish & Game Departments.

 

Uses of an Impact Study:

  • Copies of the impact study will be sent to every Congressman and State Legislator, including the Governor.
  • Copies of the impact study will also be sent to Ed Klim of the International Snowmobile Manufacture Association and have been used several times in reports to manufacturers.
  • Has helped to develop new snowmobiling programs.
  • Municipalities/communities have substantially increased their level of support for snowmobiling. This increase suggests that communities are more aware of the economic value of snowmobiling, and are contributing more to trail maintenance and promotional activities to attract snowmobiling participants.
  • From          a management perspective, the knowledge gained from the economic impact study can be used for the evaluation and assessments of new trail programs, projects and in planning for the future growth of the sport of snowmobiling.

2010/2011 IMAPCT STUDY

Check Your Mailboxes – the 2010/2011 Economic Impact Study is in the Mail!

By Gail Hanson – NHSA Executive Director

 

The NHSA has contracted with the Institute for New Hampshire Studies, Plymouth State University to conduct research about the economic impact of snowmobiling in New Hampshire during the 2010/2011 season. Your participation will be very important, as it will aid the New Hampshire Snowmobile Association’s efforts to support this outstanding sport and have a possible impact on legislative funding for the sport. The impact study is being mailed to a select group of names selected by a computer process. The survey will have approximately 10 questions, so please take your time and answer these questions as thoroughly and accurately as possible.

 

Thank you in advance for your cooperation and interest in supporting snowmobiling in New Hampshire.

 

Why should the Association do an Impact Study?

The impact study of 2002/2003 has given the association a new image. We are no longer looked at as just a group of snowmobilers. We are now thought of as a group that has power, clout, and the ability to make a sufficient difference when it comes to passing or not passing legislation. Over the years, snowmobiler’s needs and interests have become more complex. This means that we need statistics to help people understand what is happening and have a basis for planning the future of our sport. This impact study will illustrate the huge influence that snowmobiling has on the New Hampshire economy. The study will also show that all areas of the state benefit from snowmobiling activities, and that snowmobiling is one of the most important recreational activities in the State during the winter season.

 

The last impact study was done in 2002/2003. The results from this study showed:

  • Total impact on the state’s economy by snowmobilers was nearly $1.2 billion.
  • Spending by snowmobilers was 1% of the gross state product and more than 10% of all travelers spending in the state.
  • Average spending per visitor per day in New Hampshire was $67.07 per resident and $88.30 from non-residents.
  • In addition to spending on their trips, each snowmobiler spends $1,830.00 annually on equipment, clothing, club membership, insurance and state license fees.
  • Snowmobilers spend money on accommodations, for ground transportation, eating at restaurants, retail shopping, and other activities. All sectors of the economy benefit from snowmobiling activity. 8,099 New Hampshire jobs exist because of snowmobiling. The vast majority of those jobs (79%) are in the hospitality and leisure sector.
  • Substantial segment of snowmobile spending ends up being collected by the state in the form of state tax. 8.6 cents of every dollar spent in New Hampshire, by a snowmobiler, ends up being directly collected by the state. The state of course collects money in taxes on lodging, restaurants, foods, gasoline, business profits, registrations and fees paid to the State Parks Fish & Game Departments.

 

Uses of an Impact Study:

  • Copies of the impact study will be sent to every Congressman and State Legislator, including the Governor.
  • Copies of the impact study will also be sent to Ed Klim of the International Snowmobile Manufacture Association and have been used several times in reports to manufacturers.
  • Has helped to develop new snowmobiling programs.
  • Municipalities/communities have substantially increased their level of support for snowmobiling. This increase suggests that communities are more aware of the economic value of snowmobiling, and are contributing more to trail maintenance and promotional activities to attract snowmobiling participants.
  • From          a management perspective, the knowledge gained from the economic impact study can be used for the evaluation and assessments of new trail programs, projects and in planning for the future growth of the sport of snowmobiling.

Snowmobile Season Delayed

THIS JUST IN…………..

Snowmobile Season Delayed Due to Lack of Snow
December 15th is usually the kick-off for the snowmobile season.

 

(Concord, NHDecember 15, 2011) The Division of Parks and Recreation, Bureau of Trails announces to winter trail users that the snowmobile trail system is not open for use at this time. The trails typically open on December 15th, with adequate snow cover on the ground.  The unseasonably warm weather is suspending opening but the Bureau and volunteer clubs around New Hampshire are ready for when the snow arrives.  Gates are still closed and logging operations still ongoing. Check the Bureau’s website for current trail conditions throughout the winter.

Riders can sign up online to have trail conditions reports sent to them via email.  The reports will begin as soon as the season officially begins. The reports are updated by the Bureau on Tuesdays and Fridays and are posted at www.nhtrails.org. Riders can also check local club websites for information on conditions in their designed riding areas.

december news

The days are getting shorter & colder-we have had a taste of snow already, so it won’t be long now before the season is underway! Predictions are for cold & snowy-let’s hope it’s as good, if not better, than last year! Get your membership forms in so you can register your sled & be ready when all is white. Trails officially open on December 15th provided there is enough snow cover.

Trail work has been ongoing all summer & fall. Bob ran the excavator through September repairing old trails & rerouting a few for this year. Irene hit us pretty hard in places washing out culverts & bridges. A lot of tree damage still needed to be cleaned up from last winter’s ice storm. Thanks to the work of this small dedicated group, many of the trails are in tip-top shape: Bob Smith, Rowell Ray, Guy Taylor, John & Andrew Bordeaux, Peter & Glorie Galpin, & Ted Kobersky.

The Trailmaster’s meeting was well attended & held this year at Gunstock Ski area in Gilford. Several new breakout sessions were introduced, and director John Bordeaux & club member Peter Galpin received their groomer awareness certificates after taking the course. The Trails Bureau has been working on a DVD training program so that clubs may teach their own operators. All clubs will be receiving a copy soon. This should help clubs who have more people who want to groom but could not take the course. A person must be 21 years old, have a clean driving record for 3 years, and have the groomer awareness certificate in order to become a groomer operator.

Along with everyone else, the state is feeling a crunch too. A few rest areas around the state have closed due to budget cuts-Rumney is one of them. After much discussion it will be closed this year & next, so parking will not be allowed there. There is a windmill project in Groton, and that company will be leasing the property. There will be gates installed and anyone parking there will be towed at the owner’s expense.

We fed nearly 50 people at our annual community Thanksgiving Day dinner this year. Thanks go out to Arlyn & Brenda Clement/Clement’s Nursery, Jim Covey, Dorchester Grange, and Laconia Electric for their generous donations that make this day happen for those in need. Thanks also go out to: Marie & Ed Hixson, M.a., Jay, & Lukie Ricci, Darlene Oaks, & Vic Henry who along with me prepare & serve this wonderful dinner.

Upcomming events include poker runs, bbqs, vintage rides, & bonfires-all we need now is SNOW!! January 8 & 22/February 19/March 4-vintage rides. January 14th-our annual poker run & bbq for Easter Seals. February 25th-poker run & bonfire. All rides will depend on having snow covered trails.

 

Do you have email? One of the most challenging things is to get all of the addresses in a data base-it is constantly changing, and sometimes applications are difficult to decifer. If you would like to receive the newsletter & any other club mailings please go to our website & create an account where you will automatically be put into the mass mailing data base. If you do not wish to create an account there, email me directly at eferrell@roadrunner.com & I will add you to my BRVSC contacts there.

The trails & the clubhouse will be open as soon as conditions allow-we are always looking to add more smiling faces to our crew of hardworking kitchen staff. We are open weekends through the season & would welcome more help with this.

Merry Christmas-wish for snow & lots of it!!

evie