Trails Update 2/7/19

Everyone is wondering how BRVSC fared in this week’s warmer temps. Luckily with our great base, and all the efforts put in early in the season the answer is not too bad! Thank you to our riders for staying off the system this week. Your patience is greatly appreciated so we can stretch this season as far as possible.

  • Clubhouse North on Corridor 8 to Green Camp is thin with icy spots and even a few bare spots. Keep in mind this is that area that was already thin due to logging operations. Conditions quickly improve past the Green Camp.
  • Ten Mile Road, Rocky Loop and Little Rocky Loop were all groomed on Wednesday night and in great shape.
  • North Groton/Hog Hill area was groomed early Monday before the temps climbed. Assuming there was minimal traffic that area should’ve held well.

The groomer is scheduled to run later today and leading into the weekend if temps allow. Watch Facebook for more updates, and if you can be patient for just another day, Mother Nature is dropping those temps again for the weekend!

The Clubhouse and Grump’s Grill are celebrating New England this weekend!  Whether you’re from Meddybemps Vermont, Wyoming, Rhode Island, or Eggemoggin Maine you’re always welcome to #ridebakerriver.

Website Changes

We’ve made some changes to the website in preparation for the upcoming season. Although the site looks the similar we’ve revamped the photo gallery, calendar and club newsletter. Most members are using Facebook in favor of the old forum so the forum was removed to prevent spam and simplify the site. To make it easier for our members to get news we’ve also integrated our website into our Facebook page. Follow us on Facebook to get the latest news and updates as well as communicate with other club members. Some questions we’ve heard and the corresponding answers are below.

  • Q: I can’t log in to the website? A: We’ve removed the log in to the website. It’s primary purpose was the riders forum and we’ve removed that portion of the site.
  • Q: Will I still get the club newsletter? A: Yes, we’ve transferred the old mailing list to the new newsletter and you’ll continue to the club newsletter.
  • Q: How can I subscribe to the Club Newsletter? A: Enter your information on the right hand column of the club’s homepage. You’ll receive a confirmation email to insure you really want to receive the newsletter, be sure to click on the confirmation link within that email.
  • Q: How can I unsubscribe from the Club Newsletter? A: Click on the unsubscribe link at the bottom of the newsletter.
  • Q: I have some pictures I want to give the club for the site, how can I get them to the club? A: Post your pictures on the club’s Facebook wall or Email them to Ev.

Think Snow!!!!

SNOW!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Looks like all the dances may have finally paid off-it is snowing here in BRVSC country! If the forcast is correct, we may be riding this weekend.

The guys will take the tucker out tomorrow if there is enough snow & get the trails opened up. They did note that there is a lot of ice yesterday when they opened up the gates, especially on corridor 8 leading up to the green camp, so please be careful if you are out. It takes time to get through the whole system and there may also be some downed trees to clear.

 

If there is rideable snow, we will open the clubhouse for saturday & sunday.

 

we’ll keep you updated here & on facebook as to conditions……………………… 

2010/2011 IMPACT STUDY

Check Your Mailboxes – the 2010/2011 Economic Impact Study is in the Mail!

By Gail Hanson – NHSA Executive Director

 

The NHSA has contracted with the Institute for New Hampshire Studies, Plymouth State University to conduct research about the economic impact of snowmobiling in New Hampshire during the 2010/2011 season. Your participation will be very important, as it will aid the New Hampshire Snowmobile Association’s efforts to support this outstanding sport and have a possible impact on legislative funding for the sport. The impact study is being mailed to a select group of names selected by a computer process. The survey will have approximately 10 questions, so please take your time and answer these questions as thoroughly and accurately as possible.

 

Thank you in advance for your cooperation and interest in supporting snowmobiling in New Hampshire.

 

Why should the Association do an Impact Study?

The impact study of 2002/2003 has given the association a new image. We are no longer looked at as just a group of snowmobilers. We are now thought of as a group that has power, clout, and the ability to make a sufficient difference when it comes to passing or not passing legislation. Over the years, snowmobiler’s needs and interests have become more complex. This means that we need statistics to help people understand what is happening and have a basis for planning the future of our sport. This impact study will illustrate the huge influence that snowmobiling has on the New Hampshire economy. The study will also show that all areas of the state benefit from snowmobiling activities, and that snowmobiling is one of the most important recreational activities in the State during the winter season.

 

The last impact study was done in 2002/2003. The results from this study showed:

  • Total impact on the state’s economy by snowmobilers was nearly $1.2 billion.
  • Spending by snowmobilers was 1% of the gross state product and more than 10% of all travelers spending in the state.
  • Average spending per visitor per day in New Hampshire was $67.07 per resident and $88.30 from non-residents.
  • In addition to spending on their trips, each snowmobiler spends $1,830.00 annually on equipment, clothing, club membership, insurance and state license fees.
  • Snowmobilers spend money on accommodations, for ground transportation, eating at restaurants, retail shopping, and other activities. All sectors of the economy benefit from snowmobiling activity. 8,099 New Hampshire jobs exist because of snowmobiling. The vast majority of those jobs (79%) are in the hospitality and leisure sector.
  • Substantial segment of snowmobile spending ends up being collected by the state in the form of state tax. 8.6 cents of every dollar spent in New Hampshire, by a snowmobiler, ends up being directly collected by the state. The state of course collects money in taxes on lodging, restaurants, foods, gasoline, business profits, registrations and fees paid to the State Parks Fish & Game Departments.

 

Uses of an Impact Study:

  • Copies of the impact study will be sent to every Congressman and State Legislator, including the Governor.
  • Copies of the impact study will also be sent to Ed Klim of the International Snowmobile Manufacture Association and have been used several times in reports to manufacturers.
  • Has helped to develop new snowmobiling programs.
  • Municipalities/communities have substantially increased their level of support for snowmobiling. This increase suggests that communities are more aware of the economic value of snowmobiling, and are contributing more to trail maintenance and promotional activities to attract snowmobiling participants.
  • From          a management perspective, the knowledge gained from the economic impact study can be used for the evaluation and assessments of new trail programs, projects and in planning for the future growth of the sport of snowmobiling.

2010/2011 IMAPCT STUDY

Check Your Mailboxes – the 2010/2011 Economic Impact Study is in the Mail!

By Gail Hanson – NHSA Executive Director

 

The NHSA has contracted with the Institute for New Hampshire Studies, Plymouth State University to conduct research about the economic impact of snowmobiling in New Hampshire during the 2010/2011 season. Your participation will be very important, as it will aid the New Hampshire Snowmobile Association’s efforts to support this outstanding sport and have a possible impact on legislative funding for the sport. The impact study is being mailed to a select group of names selected by a computer process. The survey will have approximately 10 questions, so please take your time and answer these questions as thoroughly and accurately as possible.

 

Thank you in advance for your cooperation and interest in supporting snowmobiling in New Hampshire.

 

Why should the Association do an Impact Study?

The impact study of 2002/2003 has given the association a new image. We are no longer looked at as just a group of snowmobilers. We are now thought of as a group that has power, clout, and the ability to make a sufficient difference when it comes to passing or not passing legislation. Over the years, snowmobiler’s needs and interests have become more complex. This means that we need statistics to help people understand what is happening and have a basis for planning the future of our sport. This impact study will illustrate the huge influence that snowmobiling has on the New Hampshire economy. The study will also show that all areas of the state benefit from snowmobiling activities, and that snowmobiling is one of the most important recreational activities in the State during the winter season.

 

The last impact study was done in 2002/2003. The results from this study showed:

  • Total impact on the state’s economy by snowmobilers was nearly $1.2 billion.
  • Spending by snowmobilers was 1% of the gross state product and more than 10% of all travelers spending in the state.
  • Average spending per visitor per day in New Hampshire was $67.07 per resident and $88.30 from non-residents.
  • In addition to spending on their trips, each snowmobiler spends $1,830.00 annually on equipment, clothing, club membership, insurance and state license fees.
  • Snowmobilers spend money on accommodations, for ground transportation, eating at restaurants, retail shopping, and other activities. All sectors of the economy benefit from snowmobiling activity. 8,099 New Hampshire jobs exist because of snowmobiling. The vast majority of those jobs (79%) are in the hospitality and leisure sector.
  • Substantial segment of snowmobile spending ends up being collected by the state in the form of state tax. 8.6 cents of every dollar spent in New Hampshire, by a snowmobiler, ends up being directly collected by the state. The state of course collects money in taxes on lodging, restaurants, foods, gasoline, business profits, registrations and fees paid to the State Parks Fish & Game Departments.

 

Uses of an Impact Study:

  • Copies of the impact study will be sent to every Congressman and State Legislator, including the Governor.
  • Copies of the impact study will also be sent to Ed Klim of the International Snowmobile Manufacture Association and have been used several times in reports to manufacturers.
  • Has helped to develop new snowmobiling programs.
  • Municipalities/communities have substantially increased their level of support for snowmobiling. This increase suggests that communities are more aware of the economic value of snowmobiling, and are contributing more to trail maintenance and promotional activities to attract snowmobiling participants.
  • From          a management perspective, the knowledge gained from the economic impact study can be used for the evaluation and assessments of new trail programs, projects and in planning for the future growth of the sport of snowmobiling.